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G/T Information

 

Nemo Vista Gifted and Talented

 

 

                                                                               

  Brandi Hill-Lewis K-12 Gifted and Talented Coordinator AP Coordinator 

blewis@nemo.k12.ar.us

 

5 Ways to Foster Creativity in your Kids

 

Many people assume that creativity is an inborn talent that their kids either do or do not have. But actually, creativity is more skill than inborn talent, and it is a skill parents can help their kids develop. Because it is a key to success in nearly everything we do, creativity is a key component of health and happiness and a core skill to practice with kids. Creativity is not limited to artistic and musical expression—it is also essential for science, math, and even social and emotional intelligence.  Creative people are more flexible and better problem solvers, which makes them more able to adapt to technological advances and deal with change—as well as take advantage of new opportunities.
 

Here are some ideas for fostering creativity in your kids:
 

1. Make your home a Petri dish for creativity– foster a creative atmosphere. Solicit a high volume of different ideas, but resist the urge to evaluate the ideas your kids come up with. At dinnertime, for example, you could brainstorm activities for the upcoming weekend, encouraging the kids to come up with things they've never done. Don't point out which ideas aren't possible, or which ideas are best. The focus of creative activities should be on process: generating (vs. evaluating) new ideas. Celebrate innovation and creativity. Cover your walls with art and other evidence of creative expression. Tell your kids all about your favorite artists, musicians, and scientists. Share your passion for architecture or photography or that new band you want to listen to all the time.

2. Allow kids the freedom and autonomy to explore their ideas and do what they want. Don't be so bossy. External constraints—making them color within the lines, so to speak—can reduce flexibility in thinking.
 

3. Encourage children to read for pleasure and participate in the arts. Limit TV and other screen time in order to make room for creative activities- rehearsing a play, learning to draw, reading every book written by a favorite author.

4. Give children the opportunity to express "divergent thought." Let them disagree with you. Encourage them to find more than one route to a solution, and more than one solution to a problem. When they successfully solve a problem, ask them to solve it again but to find a new way to do it.

5. Don't reward children for exhibiting creativity: incentives interfere with the creative process, reducing the quality of their responses and the flexibility of their thought. Allow children to develop mastery of creative activities they’re intrinsically motivated to do, rather than trying to motivate them with rewards and incentives.

http://greatergood.berkeley.edu/raising_happiness/post/7_ways_to_foster_creativity_in_your_kids


Brandi Lewis

K-12 Gifted and Talented Coordinator

 

AP Class Information

 

 

 

What does it mean to be Gifted:

 

Arkansas Department of Education Definition of Gifted:

Gifted and Talented children and youth are those of high potential or ability, whose learning characteristics and educational needs require qualitatively differentiated education experience and/or services.  Possession of these talents and gifts, or the potential for their development, will be evidenced through an interaction of above intellectual ability, task commitment and/or motivation, creative ability

Nemo Vista Gifted and Talented Program:

Gifted and Talented teacher will provide the following service to students:

K-2 Whole Group Enrichment 30 minutes per week

3-6 Pull out Service 150 minutes per week

7-8 Pull out Service 3 times per week for 40 minutes and AP English

9-12 AP classes and weekly X period student meetings

 

Gifted and Talented Curriculum Goals:

  1. Provide opportunities for students to pursue individual interests and develop talent.

  2. Provide support for the social and emotional needs of gifted students.

  3. Provide differentiation in content, process, and/or product.

  4. Provide opportunities for creativity, investigation of problems in depth, develop products (both digital and paper based), presentation skills, and higher order thinking skills.

 

Scope and Sequence

 

Gifted and Talented Referral Stages:

 

Stage 1 Referral: A student is referred for Gifted and Talented services.  A referral form can be found on the district website, in the elementary, middle school, and high school offices. Referral may be made at any time during the school year. Referral can be made by parents, teachers, principals, counselors, or community members.

Referral Form

Stage 2 Data Collection:  Data is collected from a variety of sources to aid in making decisions for selection of students who are in need of gifted and talented services. Parents will be notified by Gifted and Talented Coordinator of referral and permission to collected data forms must be signed by parent.  

Data Collection

Stage 3 Data Analysis and Placement: A committee of at least 5 members analyzes data to determine the best placement of the student.  Student placement decisions are based on a multiple criterion.  No single criterion or cut-off score is used to include or exclude a student. Placement meetings will be held in October and April.


Appeal Process:

Step 1: Request an initial meeting with the Gifted and Talented Coordinator at your child's school. 

Step 2: If the decision is still unsatisfactory, a written formal appeal may be submitted.  Upon receipt of a formal notice of appeal, the GT Coordinator may collect additional information/data concerning the student. A district appeals committee of at least 5 professional educators, chaired by the GT Coordinator, will review the appeal.

Step 3: The decision will be based on multiple criteria and communication regarding a decision will be made to the referring party in writing. The decision by the Appeals Committee is final.

 

**Procedures used in the identification process are non-discriminatory with respect to race, cultural or economic background, religion, national origin, sex or handicapping condition.

 

                            

 

 

Public Meeting Information

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 

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